Gaming Articles

Making an Awesome D&D Character: Step 0

One of the best ways to start a character is to find an idea of what you want to build. Many characters can be created using a basic concept or even a cool picture or video you saw online.

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One of the best ways to start a character is to find an idea of what you want to build. Many characters can be created using a basic concept or even a cool picture or video you saw online. Inspiration is everywhere! You may find that you don’t know how to put into words what you’re looking to do. That is okay. This process is designed to help flush out your understanding of some basic Dungeons and Dragons (D&D) Fifth Edition rules and concepts so that you can build a character you can be proud to bring to the table.

A great resource to use if you’re stuck is your Dungeon Master (DM). They are there to help tell the story of your adventurer. They also know rules, concepts, and can act as a sounding board for ideas. It’s also important to discuss character creation with your DM since they may have ideas on races or classes that aren’t allowed, starting power level, and other advanced rules that may change what you want to play. For example, if you’re playing in a world where magic is outlawed and punishable by death, you need to consider whether playing a spell-casting class such as a wizard or a sorcerer is worth the concern of always looking over your shoulder in game.

Some things to ask your DM:

  • What level are we starting at?
  • How are we generating ability scores?
  • Are any classes or races restricted?
  • Is there anything I need to know about the world during character creation?

The DM will likely give out this information already, but if not, it may have just slipped their mind in the excitement of getting a game running.

If you’re following along through the process, it’s a good idea to put your name in the Player Name section and to write how many experience points you are starting with should your DM decides to use that system. Experience points (xp) are used to determine progression through your class. Progressing through a class determines a number of class features such as how many hits you can take in a fight (hit points or HP), special abilities or spells, and when you can increase your ability scores (more on this later).

Resources to Help:

  • Where2Game’s Dungeons and Dragons 5th Edition Character Sheet Helper
  • Dungeons & Dragons: Player’s Handbook

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